Notes from a very small island – 2

 With a brilliant architect and artist

The fact that I have not heard of an architect or even artist, is no reflection on her or his brilliance or creativity: it is solely down to my spectacular ignorance. Anyway, we discovered that Lanzarote and its tourism (not on the coast) was down to a man called Cesar Manrique. Manrique was, by turn, a visual artist, an architect, a gardener and an early environmental campaigner.
Born in 1919 to a poor family from Lanzarote, he travelled widely and learned greatly from artists around the world. He returned to the Island in the late 1950s and started working on the island and learning from it, drawing inspiration for his art and architecture.
His desire was to create art and architecture that complemented the island’s story and structure. Interestingly he never used materials from the landscape to create. However, he used the structures of rock as a basis and backdrop for his work. He would use plaster and plastics to tie in the lava structures to the walls of a habitable space. The effect is fabulous,
He was the inspiration behind the man-made parts of the Jameos de Agua as well as the “Mirador del Agua” which overlooks the north of the island, and clings to the cliff of another volcano. He also designed some spectacular art pieces within that Mirador. A true genius.
The final day we had our hire car, we visited his house that he designed and had built and where he did most of his creations. It is mainly build within “lava bubbles”‘ caused by trapped gas which was expelled when the lava cooled. My trapped gas has never been so creative. Anyway, Manrique joined several of these bubbles to create living spaces, eating areas and lookout places.
Manrique used the idea of natural light, which had observed in the Jamelos to great effect in these rooms. The ever present volcanic grit was used as a planter for the garden borders.
He also campaigned against the over commercialisation of the island, getting laws passed to limit the advertising signs (great) as well as the size and positioning of road signage (boo, and we’ll get on to this tomorrow).
All in all Manrique was a brilliant and wholistic artist. One commentary said he was able to “convert aesthetics into ethics.”
Sadly, he died in a road accident in 1992 but his influence is to be seen over most of Lanzarote.